Blogs

Bob Kefgen's picture

This Week in Politics in 5 Sentences (or Fewer)

On Tuesday, the House Workforce and Talent Development Committee reported out a pair of education related bills: SB 344 would create an optional state-recognized STEM diploma endorsement that school districts could give students at their discretion and HB 5907 would require districts to inform students about college-credit-by-testing options like AP, IB, and CLEP, which most districts do already.

Bob Kefgen's picture

This Week in Politics in 5 Sentences (or Fewer)

The House Workforce Committee took testimony but no votes this week on a pair of education bills: SB 344 would create an optional state-recognized STEM diploma endorsement that school districts could give students at their discretion and HB 5907 would require districts to inform students about college-credit-by-testing options like AP, IB, and CLEP, which is not a new requirement, but would add some additional specificity to an existing state law.

Bob Kefgen's picture

Positive News from Consensus Revenue Estimates

The State Treasurer and directors of the House and Senate Fiscal Agencies met Wednesday to come to consensus on the revenue estimates that will be used to finalize state budgets for next year. The short story: better than expected income tax revenue means more money in both the State's general fund and School Aid Fund for both the current year and next year. Hopefully the increased projections in both funding sources mean the Legislature is less likely to increase their raid on the School Aid Fund to pay for general fund projects…but no guarantees.

Here is a breakdown by the numbers and then some context of how this is likely to play out as the Legislature and Governor's office work to finalize budgets for the 2018-19 school year.

By the Numbers

Bob Kefgen's picture

This Week in Politics in 5 Sentences (or Fewer)

State Superintendent Brian Whiston passed away Monday after a battle with cancer, a loss that MASSP and many others in the education community are mourning and one that could have significant implications in terms of state education policy, as the ink is still wet on many of the reforms implemented under his leadership. The House Law and Justice Committee continued it's two-meeting-per-week schedule on Tuesday and Wednesday, taking up the Senate's version of legislation introduced in response to the Nassar sexual abuse case.

Bob Kefgen's picture

Proposed Sexual Abuse Legislation Has K-12 Implications

In the last few months, both the House and Senate have been working on legislation dealing with sexual assault and sexual abuse. Some of these bills are a direct response to the Larry Nassar sexual abuse case while others are ideas that have been around a while, but are just now receiving consideration in light of recent events. Regardless of their origin, bills in both the Senate and House bill packages have implications for K-12 education and some would have direct impacts at the building level.