Blogs

Matt Alley's picture

Winter Workshop for Activity Advisers

Do your student advisers need fresh ideas and support? Then consider having them join MASC/MAHS on Friday, January 30 and Saturday, January 31 for a two-day workshop at the Soaring Eagle Resort. The event is packed with influential speakers, programmatic resources, adviser breakout sessions and adviser-to-adviser networking unlike anywhere else. Your student advisers will have opportunities to network, be inspired and leave with new, program-defining activities and resources!

Bob Kefgen's picture

This Week in Politics in 5 Sentences (or Fewer)

Educator evaluation bills ran out of time in the closing hours of the 2014 legislative session as negotiations, which trailed late into the night on the last day of session, failed to produce a compromise. The legislature was able to reach a compromise on a road funding plan that doesn't hurt schools and, potentially, increases future school revenue.

Bob Kefgen's picture

Evaluation Laws Will Have to Wait Until 2015

Despite strong support in the House and the full backing of the Governor's office, the 2014 session clock ran out for a pair of bills to create a new, research-based educator evaluation system in Michigan. With both bill sponsors and Governor Snyder returning to office, expect this to be an issue that receives attention early in the 2015 legislative cycle, especially because the money allocated to pay for the new system remains unspent in a special Educator Evaluation Reserve Fund awaiting legislation.

wendyz@michiganprincipals.org's picture

#MASSPchat 12/22 - Lame Duck Recap and Looking Forward to 2015

The Topic:
Lawmakers wrapped up the 2013-14 legislative session this week. Find out how things shook out on the various education issues that were still swirling. In #MASSPchat, we will recap the lame duck session and chat about what passed, what didn't, and what that means for schools. We will also preview what issues are likely to be debated going into 2015 and what early indications are for how the 2015-16 School Aid budget could shake out.

Bob Kefgen's picture

This Week in Politics in 5 Sentences (or Fewer)

The Five-Day Rule (also known as Article IV, Section 26 of the Michigan Constitution) requires that bills have to wait for five days in both the House and Senate before they can be voted on in order to ensure the public has a chance to see and weigh in on legislation without the legislature being able to railroad it through in a single day in the dead of night. With only three days of House session and four of Senate session left this year, it also means that any legislation that hasn't already passed at least one chamber is effectively dead for the year.