Bob Kefgen's blog

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This Week in Politics in 5 Sentences (or Fewer)

The Senate and House Education Committees both got into the mix this week, the former taking testimony on school safety drills, the latter hearing from the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) on letter grades for schools and social promotion.

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Submit Your Positive Public Education Stories to MPSP

MEA/AFT Uniserv directors and representatives from MASA, MASB, MEMSPA and MASSP have been meeting for several months in an effort to develop a method to promote the value of public education easily and cost-effectively.

Dubbed the Michigan Public Schools Partnership (MPSP) its mission is “to promote the value of public education in Michigan. Community public schools are a key component of our democracy that ensures all students have access to a quality education and a brighter future.”

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This Week in Politics in 5 Sentences (or Fewer)

The House Education Committee took up two sweeping bills this week that appear to be on a troubling fast track. HB 5111 would prohibit students from enrolling in fourth grade without first being proficient on the state's third grade reading assessment while HB 5112 would replace Michigan entire school accountability system with a new letter grade system beginning in 2015-16.

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House Panel Debates Letter Grades for Schools, Social Promotion

On Wednesday, House Education Committee members heard testimony on and debated a pair of bills that would tackle two separate but equally controversial issues. One bill would attempt to replace Michigan's current accountability system with a single new letter-grade scorecard system. The other would mandate that schools retain third graders who are not proficient on the third grade reading MEAP until they attain proficiency.

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This Week in Politics in 5 Sentences (or Fewer)

Common Core is finally finished…well…mostly finished. On Thursday, the Senate passed a revised version of the Common Core resolution that made it through the House almost a month ago and, while the final version still needs House concurrence (which is expected next Tuesday), the Senate action was sufficient to meet the legal requirement for an "affirmative action" that the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) needed in order to end what was effectively a mini-government shutdown caused by the CCSS fiasco.