Bob Kefgen's blog

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Senate CCSS Hearing: Tea Party vs. Everyone Else

After roughly three and a half hours of testimony on Wednesday, Senate Republicans still seem undecided on how and when to move forward with resolving Michigan's ongoing debate over the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

However, while CCSS is certainly the topic of discussion, the underlying political battle seems to have a lot more to do with Tea Party conservatives versus traditional conservatives and not nearly as much to with the content or quality of the standards.

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Clarification on Impact of Common Core Ban

MASSP has received a number of inquiries from members about where Michigan stands with relation to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and the impact of the "pause" on CCSS and Smarter Balanced.

As of today, October 1, language in the MDE budget takes effect and prevents the Department from expending funds to implement CCSS and the Smarter Balanced assessment.

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This Week in Politics in 5 Sentences (or Fewer)

The House finally moved forward this week with a concurrent resolution that could settle the ongoing debate about Common Core in Michigan. House Concurrent Resolution 11 isn't a panacea, but it would allow the state Department of Education and local districts to move forward on CCSS implementation with some level of confidence.

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House Passes CCSS Resolution, Senate Next

The Michigan House has passed House Concurrent Resolution 11, which endorses the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and allows the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) to move forward with implementing CCSS in Michigan. The resolution is expected to be voted on in the Senate next week, AND WE NEED YOUR HELP to push CCSS over the finish line.

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This Week in Politics in 5 Sentences (or Fewer)

The Senate Banking and Financial Institutions Committee took testimony on a bill to add a half credit of financial literacy to the Michigan Merit Curriculum. MASSP spoke in opposition to the bill and the committee, for its part, expressed skepticism about the legislation, did not vote on it, and ultimately re-referred it to the Senate Education Committee so it could be more appropriately debated in the context of other education bills.