Bob Kefgen's picture

This Week in Politics in 5 Sentences (or Fewer)

The House Education Reform Committee was packed to the gills on Thursday when they took testimony, but did not vote on a pair of bills that would—among other things—simplify the process for getting a non-medical waiver (i.e. a waiver for religious or philosophical reasons) from Michigan’s vaccination rules for students.  The House Health Policy Committee passed legislation that would require that MDE embed instruction about prescription opioid drug abuse into the substance abuse section of Michigan's health education content standards. Neither the Senate Education Committee or the Senate Education Subcommittee on the Michigan Merit Curriculum met this past week, though the former panel is slated to meet this coming week, presumably to take up legislation to close the MPSERS system.

Lusk Albertson PLC's picture

Criminal Penalties for Sophomoric Student Conduct?

A court in New Mexico recently tackled a case involving a factual scenario that does not seem far-fetched for those who've had the pleasure of working with or raising young boys. In A.M. v. Holmes, a seventh-grade student was sent to sit in the hall after repetitively generating "fake burps" during class. From the hallway, he continued to capture his classmates' attention by leaning into the classroom doorway to keep burping and laughing. This sophomoric behavior, clearly disruptive and inappropriate, needed to be addressed.

Bob Kefgen's picture

House, Senate Introduce Bills to Close MPSERS for New Employees

On Tuesday, identical bills were introduced in the House and Senate to close the MPSERS system for new employees and instead offer them a 401k-style retirement plan modeled after the benefit offered to state employees. Legislative leaders have been signaling for weeks that they intended to take a run at this issue, so the move is not unexpected. What the bills fail to address is how the legislature intends to fund the multi-billion dollar price tag that would come with closing the pension system.

Tammy Jackson's picture

The First Five Years – The New Principals Network

It is often believed that your first year of being a secondary principal is the most difficult. That is, until you are in years two through five... It really isn’t until after year five that you truly start to feel some relief. Why is that? In year one, you only “know what you know” – the lack of knowledge actually protects you from the overwhelming responsibility. As you get through subsequent years, though, you begin to acquire knowledge that actually broadens your understanding of the full scope of the job. But, that knowledge also increases your to do list and your sense of responsibility.

Bob Kefgen's picture

This Week in Politics in 5 Sentences (or Fewer)

The Senate Education Committee met Tuesday to take testimony on a pair of bills (SB 343-44) that would affect secondary principals: one to require districts to provide students with regional information on in-demand occupations during the EDP process, another to create an optional STEM diploma endorsement. MASSP testified with concerns on both bills, which are in the very earliest stages of the legislative process and have a long way to go before they have any chance of becoming law.